Think Art Loud

Inspiring, Encouraging, and Promoting the Handmade Arts and Artists

Posts Tagged ‘selling offline’

With sites like Handmade Artists, Etsy, Artfire, Zibbet, etc., it’s been made so easy to ‘set up shop’ online that selling offline might get neglected. You sign-up, make your page, and beginning listing and promoting as much as possible and wait (hope) for the sales to come. However, while the Internet is certainly a necessary part of any business, where you are going to get the most sales will almost never be online, but where people can see your artwork for themselves and talk to the artist about it.  If you intend to make a serious business out of your handmade products, selling offline is generally going to be even more critical than making sure you have an online presence. As difficult as it can be to know where online is the best place for you to sell, selling offline is often even more difficult, however, it is a very important part of most any business. Finding the best method/venue for selling offline is not at all an easy task, and can be extremely frustrating in the beginning, but very rewarding.

If you are new to selling offline, you quite possibly find the thought a little overwhelming and may not be sure where to even begin: begin locally. Find out about any craft shows, art fairs, bazaars, farmers markets, etc. that are going on in your area and give a few of them a try. Even if they turn out to not be the right kind of show for you, you will still be able to learn from the experience and it will help you in finding the right shows for your work. Start small, don’t just jump into the deep end of the pool without having learned how to swim.  When I first started selling offline, I started with the small craft shows in my area. They were one-day shows that cost $25-$30 a table. With most of them, I didn’t even make my table cost. Discouraging? Yes, however, I still learned a lot from those shows. I learned how the whole process of apply to and preparing for a show works, how to display your product, interaction with potential customers, and they still got my jewelry out where it could be seen and any amount of exposure gotten from shows (whether they are good or bad shows) is always a good thing. I also got some very valuable feedback about my jewelry because of these shows which helped me to realize that my work wasn’t doing well there not because there was something wrong with my work, but because they simply weren’t the right kind of shows. Both the other vendors, as well as, the patrons at the shows kept telling me that what I needed were not the craft shows, but the art fairs. Once I started trying the fine art shows, I found that they were right. I’ve gone from shows where I couldn’t even make back the $25 booth fee to shows costing between $100-$200 and making in 1 or 2 days the equivalent of 2-3 months of checks at my part-time job.

So, if you are just starting to sell at offline venues, get your feet wet first with the small shows in your area to get a feel for how shows work and what kind of show does well for you.  Local shows, you can often find out about at your chamber of commerce office, or sometimes even posted around town on public bulletin boards.  Once you gotten more comfortable doing shows and have a better feel for what kind of show you need, you can begin looking farther afield from where you live.   There are all sorts of websites out there to help you find shows, as well as, printed publications that can assist you in finding shows.

Other options for selling offline are selling via consignment or wholesale, however, I would really recommend you approach either of these options very carefully and not rush into them before you are ready to.

Follow
Get every new post delivered to your inbox
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com